Man Bites Dog

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After an all-hands-on-deck manhunt for the man that has provided the Left with an excuse to feign victimhood yet again, authorities have arrested a Florida man they say sent 13 makeshift bombs to various high-profile Dims throughout the country. Cesar Sayoc, 56, was arrested this morning in Plantation, Fla., at an AutoZone car parts shop.

After a peaceful surrender, cops hauled away a white van plastered with almost caricature-like stickers expressing both support for PDT and animosity toward the myriad Fake News/Deep State figures trying to bring him down.

Featuring classic Trump catch phrases such as “Dishonest Media” and“CNN Sucks” along with crosshairs over a liberal journalist and Hillzdawg Clinton, the van looked like something straight from the script of an anti-Trump movie.

As for the van’s owner, well, he seems to be quite the character, Let’s see what we can learn about him, along with the case as a whole. All I ask is for an open mind when reading. 

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Who is Cesar Sayoc?

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While there is still much to learn about our alleged fail-bomber, we do know a good bit thanks to social media. Some of his posts seemed to suggest he was part of the Seminole tribe in Florida. But Lenny Altieri, a relative, said that Sayoc’s father was from the Philippines and his mother was from Brooklyn. He was reportedly raised by grandparents after having problems with his mother.

Sayoc had short stints in college as a young man and loved soccer, as was reflected several places on his van. He attended Brevard College, a small, Methodist-affiliated liberal arts college in Western North Carolina, for a year beginning in the fall of 1980 and played on the soccer team but didn’t graduate, according to the college. He also attended University of North Carolina at Charlotte for one year starting in 1983.

Records show he indeed became a registered Republican in March of 2016. Although he’s been arrested 9 times since 1991, he’s not a convicted felon, meaning his voting rights have never been stripped.

Speaking of stripping, he was apparently a “Magic Mike” style male dancer. An Ohio event promoter named Tony Valentine said he hired Sayoc to strip on multiple occasions during the 1990s and that he was so good he traveled the country for similar appearances. One cousin says that Sayoc worked in the industry as both a dancer and strip club bouncer. His photo appears repeatedly on the Facebook page “Chippen Fellas.” 

When Sayoc wasn’t stuffing dollars into his banana hammock, he was getting arrested. A lot. Here is a quick summation of his fairly extensive criminal history:
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  • In 1991 he was charged with third-degree grand theft, a felony. He pleaded guilty that same year and was sentenced to two years of probation.
  • In 1994 his mother sought a domestic violence injunction against him.
  • In 2002, he was charged with making a bomb threat in Dade County, Florida. He was sentenced to one year of probation.
  • In 2004 he was arrested on drug charges. He was accused of possession and sale of steroids, along with possession of a controlled substance without a prescription, tampering with evidence, filing fraudulent tax returns, criminal use of personal ID info and possession or unlawful issue of a driver’s license. He pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 18 months of probation.
  • In 2009, he was charged with operating without a valid license, not having insurance and not having a tag light and was fined after pleading guilty to the misdemeanor charges.
  • In 2013, he was charged with battery and third-degree grand theft, a felony. He pleaded guilty in 2014 and was sentenced to probation.
  • In 2014, he was arrested on a petit theft charge and violation of probation. He was sentenced to 30 days in jail.
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You probably noticed the #BigFat bomb threat right in the middle of that rap sheet. The story has been reported as follows:
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In August 2002, in a dispute with a power company over a bill, Sayoc was accused of threatening to blow up the company. Sayoc was on the phone with the customer service representative and “was upset over an amount that he was being billed for,” according to records released by the Miami-Dade State Attorney’s Office. He “then stated that he didn’t deserve it and that he was going to blow up” the utility.

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Eh, we’ve all been there.

The customer service rep pressed an emergency button, which began recording the conversation. Sayoc stated that what he planned would be “worse than 9/11” and that he planned to blow the agent’s head off, according to the records.

When the agent said Sayoc did not want to be making such threats, prosecutors said he had replied “that he doesn’t make threats, he makes promises.” Sayoc later explained away the incident as just a silly joke.

According to Valentine, Sayoc was also known as a muscle head whose dream was to be a professional wrestler, which would explain the history of steroid arrests. Some are pointing to his steroid use as an explanation for his prior troubles with the law, at least as it pertains to violent threats. I would be hesitant to jump on that ship, though, given that no direct causal link has been demonstrated and steroid use in itself is not sufficient to explain one’s actions.

Lots of guys do steroids. They don’t all threaten to blow up the power company. By the same token, not every guy who threatens the power company sends poorly constructed IEDs through the mail.

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Contrary to what some are saying online, Sayoc’s social media accounts were not immediately scrubbed so as to prevent anyone from seeing his posts. Rather, the entire country had access for at least an hour today until Facebook and Twitter executed their customary deletion.
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As you can imagine, journalists and civilians alike were all over it, saving as much info as possible until the inevitable ban hammer came down. His posts on various social media accounts in 2015 showed an obsession with workouts and night life promotion, naturally, but featured very little political content. But his more recent posts are very much political, to include videos of himself at Trump rallies.
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He had an inclination toward the conspiratorial side of things; an ironic fact considering the conspiracy theories that will inevitably manifest over the coming days and weeks over his arrest.

Some astute observers have pointed out that Sayoc followed leftwing accounts on Twitter, implying or outright asserting this fact as evidence that he was actually a Dim who was being portrayed as Republican by….well, someone. As one who follows far more leftwing accounts on Twitter than he, I can tell you that it’s not exactly a smoking gun of covert liberalism. The point becomes even weaker once one sees that he used those ‘follows’ to threaten or otherwise harass Dims, some of whom received one of his patented fail-bombs through the mail this week.

In one tweet, Sayoc informed George Soros “you will vanish,” though I’m sad to report that he failed to make it happen. He also blamed Soros for the Parkland shooting and a few other incidents within our borders.

The account also frequently posted angry messages about Democratic Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, whose name was listed as the return address on the mailed pipe bombs.

He also made his presence known to our friends in Antifa, letting them know “Antifa your next [sic],” in a tweet that included images of dead people killed by a python.

He also went after the newest member of the Failing New York Times editorial board, Sarah Jeong, an Asian journalist known for her overt and shameless anti-white bigotry. 

His account also sent an image of a beheaded goat to comedian Jim Carrey, an outspoken with the caption: “We will see you real soon.”

Other tweets are a bit nonsensical. For instance, he bashes ISIS and Islam in general while simultaneously praising the Islamic practice of killing gays. I’ll let you figure that one out. 


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Evidence:

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Contrary to the media narrative, we do have a presumption of innocence in this country. Evidence still matters to some of us, and I know you’re among that number, so let’s see what they’ve got. 

Sayoc faces five charges, according to the Department of Justice complaint: interstate transportation of an explosive, illegal mailing of explosives, threats against former presidents and certain other persons, threatening interstate communications, and assaulting federal officers. If found guilty on all counts, Keebler Jeff said, Sayoc would face up to 48 years in prison.

Here is the entire complaint:

 

While the first device was discovered Monday at the home of George Soros, forensic analysis didn’t begin on the packages and the devices themselves until several days later, FBI Director J. Edgar Wray said in the press conference, as the evidence slowly made its way to forensics labs on total containment vessels (specialized vehicles designed to transport explosive materials). The first to reach Quantico, Wray said, were those sent to Barry Obama and Mensa Maxine Waters.

The complaint says that the improvised explosive devices (IEDs) in all of the packages were of similar construction, each containing six inches of of PVC pipe, a small clock, a battery, wiring, and so-called energetic material, which refers to explosives that are triggered by heat, shock, or friction. Some of the mailings also contained photographs of their intended recipients with a red X marked over them.

Though the bombs were abysmal failures, the cops say they absolutely were not “dummy devices.” According to Dan Bongino and some other reliable voices, Sayoc wasn’t trying to scare people with fake bombs, but rather just really incompetent.

According to Wray, FBI lab analysts gleaned a fingerprint matching Sayoc’s from the manila envelope that contained the pipe bomb intended for Waters. The complaint says that a DNA sample from a piece of the IED inside two of the envelopes possibly matches Sayoc’s, based on a previously collected sample in possession of the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. Officials then located Sayoc by tracking his cell phone.

In addition to the fingerprint and DNA evidence, the complaint also cites Sayoc’s social media presence. A Twitter account allegedly tied to Sayoc misspelled names like “Hillary” and “Schultz” (as in former congresswoman Debbie WhyTheHellIsSheNotInJail Schultz, whose name was listed as the return address on all of the mail bomb parcels) the same way. The complaint also notes that the alleged Sayoc account was openly critical of Soros and Obama on October 24, after the mail bombs targeting both had been intercepted, although I can’t see how that could be used as evidence for anything in court. 

I openly criticized Soros and Obama on that day, too, FBI. Am I a suspect now?

The matching misspellings are stronger pieces of evidence. While misspellings of those names aren’t uncommon, generally speaking, the odds of specifically matched misspellings over several platforms being coincidence is fairly low.

All in all, the strongest alleged evidence is obviously the fingerprint/DNA. Absent a compelling story about a multi-agency, hundreds-deep conspiracy carried out by authorities, the defense will have a hard time explaining it away.

But again, none of us have seen this evidence, so it’s intellectually dishonest to declare this man guilty until he has his day in court.

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Evidence Not Seen:

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As is done in most cases of this type that allow for it, the feds were able to get a “trap and trace” order for Sayoc at least a day before he was arrested.

What this means is the government got authority to conduct surveillance on his phone specifically for the purpose of seeing who else may be in on the plot. While agents conducted physical surveillance, nerds were scanning his phone, collecting contacts, investigating said contacts, etc.

The reasoning is simple; if you monitor a bad guy before he knows he’s caught, you have a much better chance of unraveling whatever network may or may not exist, along with anyone who may have been acting as accessories to the crime. It’s good to catch a bad guy; it’s even better to catch the guy issuing his orders.

We have no idea what was unearthed during that time, if anything. Given the abruptness of his arrest, I’m inclined to believe surveillance failed to bear fruit. 


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Another line of unsatisfied inquiry relates to the delivery of the packages themselves.
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Postmarks typically indicate when and where the mail was sent from and is marked over the stamps — “canceling” them, and preventing the stamps from being reused. Unlike stamps, most of which cannot be traced, the impression left by a postmark or mail meter is distinctive, which is great for cases like these because they help investigators focus their search.
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A postmark is visible in a photo of at least one of the packages seen by Fake News CNN. However, a postmark is not visible in photos of several other packages, only adding to the questions about their origins.
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According to my research, the lack of a postmark is very rare. It would be very unusual for a piece of mail to leave the facility where it was dropped off for delivery without such a mark. That could indicate that a sender or senders were working in multiple diverse geographical areas.
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Other postal workers say it’s possible some of the stamps may not have been canceled because of the package’s soft sides and odd shape, which would make it difficult to stamp. The USPS  website also says mail may not be postmarked if it was processed through a meter or if the postage was paid by permit or pre-canceled stamp, but neither one of those appear to apply to this situation.
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Adding to the mystery are post office markings on one of two packages sent to Creepy Joe Biden indicating the stamps on the package did not cover the cost of the delivery, and additional postage is due. According to a former postal inspector on Fox, that suggests the package was weighed at some point during the shipping process.
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It was unclear from the photo whether that package had been postmarked.
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Postmarks can be applied by machine and by hand, depending on how a piece of mail is sent. When mail is run through an automated system at a processing distribution center, the postmark is applied, and the mailed item is screened by a biohazard detection system.
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Yet, postmarks were not visible on several of the packages involved in this spree. Fake News CNN of all people sent questions to the US Postal Inspection Service asking why this was the case and were promptly provided a statement that did not address the question.
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“The U.S. Postal Service has developed a comprehensive approach to protecting the mailsystem by utilizing a targeted strategy of specialized technology, screening protocols and employee training,” read the statement.
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Cool story, bro. Now explain how these packages made it to their destinations without postmarks.
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We need to know just how many of those packages were missing their postmarks. Thus far, I’ve only been able to glean that there were “a few.” How many is a few? If it’s a case of most of the packages being properly marked with a couple outliers, I suppose a case could be made for postal workers pushing a package through. If all of them share this characteristic, though, then it’s a whole different ball game.
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Hence why this section is called “evidence not seen.” It’s often more important than what is seen.
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Big Picture:

 
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This case, while certainly heading in a particular direction, is not settled. Early reports are that Sayoc isn’t cooperating with police and appears unlikely to plea guilty.
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Since he’s not talking, we’re left with the evidence that has been presented. It appears that the fingerprints and DNA (whatever that may be) are the train the feds hope to ride to a conviction, and it will likely get the job done.
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The things he has in his favor, for lack of a better phrase, are the questionable postmarking during delivery and the odd fact that none of the bombs exploded, although the latter has been explained as a simple failure to engineer a functional triggering mechanism, which is entirely possible given the apparent moderate-to-low intelligence of the suspect.
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My personal sense is that Sayoc is guilty, mostly because of the logistics and number of people that would be required to set him up. The easiest part of such a conspiracy would be to fake the postmarking, which the supposed conspirators in this case apparently failed to do. In other words, it’s much easier to fake a postmark than DNA, especially considering the multiple layers of scrutiny a forensic lab provides.
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This is only a cursory analysis, however, which is far from a court of law. The truth is none of us have actually seen the evidence, nor have we heard from the suspect himself.
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Every man and woman in this country deserves their day in court, and until he gets one, I’m going to continue asking questions.
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In the meantime, you should know that if this was nothing more than a political stunt, it failed miserably. No Trumpers are staying home on election day because of this, and no independents are changing their votes because of a wacko living out of his van.
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Perhaps it’s a sad commentary on our society, or conversely, a reassuring reminder that the media can’t control us. But at the end of the day, for better or worse, it’s just another news cycle.
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