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Daily Recap — May 15

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Bama Means Business

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Since 2015, I’ve theorized that the Left has reached “peak coochie-cap,” meaning President Trump has driven them so batty that there was no more highway to drive them further. I mean, once you’ve marched in public dressed as a vagina, where do you go from there?

Boy, was I mistaken.

Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey has just sent every Democrat in America into a level of apoplexy that producers of The Exorcist could only hope to capture with special effects.

Today, Gov. Ivey signed into law an abortion bill that discards the old nibble-around-the-edges status quo to which Republicans had become accustomed and boldly legislates according to a core pro-life belief: a human being is a human being. Gone are the days of inconvenient restrictions on Planned Parenthood; doctors in Alabama now face up to life in prison for the killing of the unborn.

“Today, I signed into law the Alabama Human Life Protection Act, a bill that was approved by overwhelming majorities in both chambers of the Legislature,” said Ivey. “To the bill’s many supporters, this legislation stands as a powerful testament to Alabamians’ deeply held belief that every life is precious and that every life is a sacred gift from God.”

The law, which passed the Alabama Senate by a healthy 25-6 margin late Tuesday night, allows exceptions “to avoid a serious health risk to the unborn child’s mother,” for ectopic pregnancy and if the “unborn child has a lethal anomaly.”

Democrats re-introduced an amendment to exempt rape and incest victims, but the motion failed by a vote of 11-21.

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Big Picture

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Aaaaaand now for the bad news.

This bill will most certainly be challenged in federal court, and it will almost certainly lose. As everyone knows, the Supreme Court took it upon itself to decide for all 50 states what their abortion law should be by miraculously finding in the Constitution a right to kill the unborn in Roe v. Wade. It wasn’t enough to let states decide for themselves, which is what the Constitution actually prescribes for situations in which federal authority isn’t clear. The left-leaning SCOTUS rendered one of the objectively worst decisions of all time in order to push their political agenda, and we’ve carried this shame ever since.

Gov. Ivey was candid about this fact when signing the bill, noting that Roe v. Wade is the law of the land and the new standards would likely be unenforceable. In the same breath, she acknowledged that the bill was meant to challenge that larger ruling once and for all. Simply put, you have to get to court to challenge Roe v. Wade, and the surest way to get there is legislation.

And that brings us to the truly heartbreaking part. If anything, the judiciary has gotten worse. Even if this law is appealed all the way to the SCOTUS, which likely won’t happen, there likely aren’t enough votes to overturn the RvW. Based on their history, neither John Roberts nor Brett Kavanaugh are likely to uphold a bill this “extreme.” While neither are what you would call “pro-choice,” they are proponents of the moderate approach. The best we can hope for are tighter restrictions that would decrease the overall number of abortions nationwide.

All the same, it’s nice to see people of faith standing up for the other side of this argument. States like New York light up their buildings to celebrate depravity in the name of “reproductive rights” while God-fearing people look on with horror a the soulless landscape we’ve created. Georgia, Alabama and several other states are pushing back to show that not everyone will go silently into that dark void.

This may not get us where we need to go, but it could very well start the process. If light is to overcome darkness, it will begin with a flicker such as this.

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